Author Topic: Location of George’s death  (Read 578 times)

mb0521

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Location of George’s death
« on: September 25, 2019, 02:06:53 PM »
Does anybody know the exact location of George’s death. I’d like to visit this location as well as his grave when I’m next in Ypres.

Brutus

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Re: Location of George’s death
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2019, 06:44:33 PM »
See page 243 in Andrew Birkin's book:
"The battalion was advancing to drive the Germans out of St. Eloi [Sint Elooi in Flemish]... George was sitting on a bank with the others.. & died almost immediately. It was impossible to comply with his wishes and bury him there, [so] they took him and buried him in a field on the left of the road ... outside Voormezele ... and they took a lot of trouble making the grave look nice, & planting it with violets."  His body was subsequently reburied in the British War Cemetery in Voormezele, so he almost got his wish.

Hope this helps. Do let us know how the grave looks when you visited.

mb0521

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Re: Location of George’s death
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2019, 08:47:37 PM »
Thanks Brutus. Is the exact location of the bank known? What amazes me is why George’s commanding officer didn’t warn his men about the possibility of snipers being in the vicinity.

mcaseNC

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Re: Location of George’s death
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2019, 05:01:43 PM »
Warnings were not necessary.  Snipers were omnipresent and by March 1915 trying to avoid them was common practice among British troops.  Other material I've read indicate that George thought he was safe and did not know he was exposed.  Death by sniper was common.  George's friend from Eton and Trinity, Chris Lawrence (grandson of Baron Lawrence, photos of he and George posted recently by Andrew) died by sniper fire 13 October 1914, only days after arriving at the Western Front.