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  WENDY:
And now, Peter, your slippers. (She affects to take off his boots and put
on
his slippers.) And your pipe, Peter: I love to fill it. (She
fills imaginary pipe, gives it him, holds a real lighted paper and he affects
to light and smoke with enjoyment. She sits with darning in the other nook by
the fire.)


  PETER:
Ah, old lady, there's nothing pleasanter of an evening when the day's toil is
over than to sit by the fire with one's smiling missus in the opposite chair
and the little ones clustering round me.


  WENDY
(beaming): It is sweet. Peter, isn't it! Peter, I think Curly
has your nose.


  PETER:
Nibs takes after you.


  WENDY:
Dear Peter, with such a large family, of course I have now passed my best, but
you don't want to change me, do you? We are an old couple now, Peter, but am
I still your Jo?


  PETER:
Always my Jo, Wendy.




(Sitting
by the fire, Wendy sings the first verse of
John Anderson, My Jo John, and
Peter sings the second verse, changing the word John to Jean. Up above the Indians
in couples, a woman and a man in each, go through the pantomime of the scene.
When the song finishes Peter moves away, looking scared as if he had wakened
up.)




  WENDY
(going to him): Peter, what is it?


  PETER:
I was just thinking — it's only make-believe, isn't it, that I'm their
father.


  WENDY
(pained): Oh, yes.


  PETER:
You see it would make me so old to be their real father.


  WENDY:
But they are ours, Peter, yours and mine.


  PETER
(anxious): But not really.


  WENDY
(bravely): Not if you don't wish it — you know, Peter, everybody
grows up, except clowns.


  PETER:
Then I want to be a clown. How can one become a clown, Wendy?


  WENDY:
I'm not sure. I think if you are funny too long, you just can't help becoming
a clown.


  PETER:
It sounds easy.


  WENDY:
But it's not very dignified and oh Peter I have other views for you. Peter what
are your exact feelings for me?


  PETER:
Those of a devoted son, Wendy.


  WENDY:
I thought so. (Crosses sadly to fire.)


  PETER:
You love me as a mother, don't you?


  WENDY:
If that's all you wish, Peter.


  PETER:
All I wish? What could be nicer, Wendy, than to be my mother?


  WENDY:
Oh Peter!


  PETER:
You're so puzzling. Tiger Lily's just the same. There's something she wants
me to be, but she says it's not my mother.


  WENDY:
No, it isn't. Indeed it isn't. (Tiger Lily is listening eagerly.)


  PETER:
Wendy, what is it you want me to be?


  WENDY:
That's a question no gentleman ought to put to a lady.


  PETER
(huffily): Oh, very well. Perhaps Tippy will tell me.


  WENDY
(with spirit): Oh yes, Tippy will tell you. She has no scruples. She
hugs you openly, though she can't go a twentieth part of the way round —
Tippy's an abandoned little creature. (Tippy darts about.)


  PETER:
She has been listening. (Tippy rings.) She says she knows she's an abandoned
little creature and that like a true woman, she glories in it. I suppose she
means that she wants to be my mother. (Tippy rings "You silly ass"
which the audience can now understand for itself.)


  WENDY
(with spirit): I almost agree with her! (Peter is hurt. Tippy darts
at Wendy and evidently pinches and pulls her hair.)
Oh! Oh! Oh!


  PETER:
Stop it Tippy. I'm very angry. Go to bed at once, you're in disgrace. (Tippy
rings defiantly.)
But you shall go! (Pulls curtain of recess open disclosing
Tippy's room.)
Come! Do you hear. (Tippy at last flies into recess and
curtains are pulled from inside as if she were in a passion. The children all
come running in wearing pyjamas.)


  NIBS:
Now Mums you promised to tell us a story as soon as we got to bed.


  WENDY:
I may be wrong, children, but as far as I can see you are not in bed
yet.


  SEVERAL:
The bed! The bed!




(Rushing
about like gay sprites they bring the bed into view. This is done by releasing
ropes and pulling it down from ceiling, which would be the best way, or it is
pulled out from wall. But whichever it is, it must come as a surprise to the
audience, who have been unaware of its existence. It is on R. of stage and all
except Peter and Wendy jump into it. It is large enough to hold the eight packed
like sardines. Wendy takes a stool beside them, but Peter remains thinking by
fire though sometimes the interest of the story draws him forward. The Indians
listen to the story through the ground, entranced.)




  CURLY:
I do hope there will be a mother in the story.


  WENDY:
Quiet, Curly. Well, there was once a gentleman —


  CURLY:
I had rather he had been a lady.


  NIBS:
Do be quiet, Curly, how could a gentleman be a lady?


  WENDY:
You mustn't interrupt. And there was a lady, also.


  CURLY:
Oho, there was a lady.


  FIRST
TWIN
: Excuse me interrupting you, Mummy, but you say there was
a lady. You mean that there is a lady also, don't you? (Anxiously.)
She's not dead, is she?


  WENDY:
Oh, no.


  TOOTLES:
I'm awfully glad she's not dead. Are you glad, John?


  JOHN:
Of course I am.


  TOOTLES:
Are you glad, Slightly?


  SLIGHTLY:
Rather!


  TOOTLES:
Are you glad, twins?


  SECOND
TWIN
: We are just glad.


  WENDY:
Oh, dear!


  PETER:
Little less noise there.


  WENDY:
The gentleman's name was Mr Darling, and her name was Mrs Darling.


  JOHN:
I knew them.


  ALEX:
I think I knew them.


  WENDY:
They were married, you know, and what do you think they had.


  TOOTLES:
It's awfully puzzling.


  WENDY:
They had three descendants.


  SLIGHTLY:
What's descendants?


  WENDY:
Well, you are one.


  SLIGHTLY
(conceited): You hear that Twins? I am a descendant.


  JOHN:
Descendants are just children.


  CURLY:
I had rather they had been white rats.


  WENDY:
Well, they are descendants also, almost everything's a descendant. Now these
three children had a dear faithful nurse called Nana, but Mr Darling was angry
with her so he chained her up in the yard and so all the children flew away.


  NIBS:
It's an awfully good story.


  WENDY:
They flew away to the Never Never Land where the lost children are.


  CURLY
(excited): I just thought they did — I don't know how it is, but
I just thought they did.


  TOOTLES:
Oh Wendy was one of the children called Tootles?


  WENDY:
Yes, he was.


  TOOTLES:
Am I in a story? Slightly, I'm in a story! Wendy, tell us what Tootles did,
tell us what Tootles said, tell us what Tootles was like!


  WENDY:
No, I want you to consider the feelings of the unhappy parents with all the
children flown away. Oh think of the empty beds! Oh think of the poor Mummy!
Oh think!


  FIRST
TWIN
: It's awfully sad.


  SECOND
TWIN
: I don't see how it can have a happy ending, do you Nibs?


  NIBS:
I'm frightfully anxious.


  WENDY:
If you knew how great is a mother's love you would have no fear.


  CURLY:
I do like a mother's love. Do you like a mother's love, Slightly?


  SLIGHTLY:
I do just.


  WENDY:
You see our heroine knew that the mother would always leave the window open
for her children to fly back by. So they stayed away for years, and had a lovely
time.


  FIRST
TWIN
: Did they ever go back?


  WENDY:
Let us now take a peep into the future. Years have rolled by, and who is this
elegant lady of uncertain age, alighting at London station?


  NIBS:
Oh Wendy, who is she?


  WENDY:
Can it be — yes — no — it is — the fair Wendy! Who are
the two noble, portly figures accompanying her — now grown to man's estate?
Can they be John and Alexander? They are! "See, dear brothers," says Wendy,
pointing upward. "There is the window still standing open. Ah now we are rewarded
for our sublime faith in a mother's love." So up they flew to their Mummy and
their Daddy, and pen cannot describe the happy scene over which we draw a veil.
(Peter who has come forward, listening intently, now gives utterance to a
cry — Wendy goes to him.)
Peter, what is it? (He gulps.) Peter,
where is it? (Feeling him like a mother searching for the seat of pain.)


  PETER:
It isn't that kind of pain.


  WENDY:
Then what — oh what is it?


  PETER:
Oh Wendy, you are wrong about mothers. Long ago I thought, like you, that my
mother would always keep the window open for me, so I stayed away for years,
and then I flew back but the window was barred, for Mother had forgotten all
about me, and there was another little boy sleeping in my bed.


  JOHN:
Wendy, let's go home!


  WENDY:
Are you sure mothers are like that?


  PETER:
Yes.


  WENDY:
John, Alexander! (Clutching them.)


  FIRST
TWIN
: You are not to leave us, Wendy!


  WENDY:
I must.


  NIBS:
Not tonight?


  WENDY:
I'm frightened to stay another moment. Peter, will you make all the necessary
arrangements?


  PETER
(huskily): If you wish it.




(He
exits and is seen emerging on top and arranging things with the Indians who
have followed all the incidents below with as much interest as the children.)




  TOOTLES:
If there is anything we could do, Wendy, to make you more comfortable.


  CURLY:
We would darn our own stockings, Wendy.


  SLIGHTLY:
We would build you a bigger house.


  WENDY:
I love my little house!


  FIRST
TWIN
: It will be worse than before she came!


  SLIGHTLY:
We shan't let her go!


  NIBS:
Let's keep her prisoner.


  FIRST
TWIN
: Let's chain her.


  SECOND
TWIN
: Wendy it's because we love you so. (They are threatening.)


  WENDY:
Oh back! Tootles, I appeal to you.


  TOOTLES
(much moved): I'm just Tootles and nobody minds me much. But the
first who does not behave to Wendy like an English gentleman, I will blood him
severely. (Draws knife.) What are you, Slightly.


  SLIGHTLY:
English gentleman.


  TOOTLES:
What are you, Nibs?


  NIBS:
English gentleman.


  TOOTLES:
What are you, Curly?


  CURLY:
English gentleman.


  TOOTLES:
What are you, Twins?


  TWINS:
English gentlemen.


  WENDY:
Dear, dear boys! (Peter re-enters.)


  PETER:
Wendy, I have asked the Redskins to guide you through the wood as flying tires
you so.


  WENDY:
Thank you, Peter.


  PETER:
They will put you into a boat when you come to the sea and Tippy will take it
it to London. Wake her, Nibs.


  NIBS
(knocking at side of recess): Tippy! Tippy! You are to get up and take
Wendy on a journey. (Bells.) She says she won't.


  PETER
(at curtain): Tippy if you don't get up and dress at once I shall open
the curtains and then we shall all see you in your negligée. (Bells.)
She says she's getting up.


  WENDY:
Dear ones, I have had such a splendid thought. If you will all come with me,
I feel almost sure I can find your mothers for you!


  SEVERAL:
Oh! Oh!


  WENDY:
You see I know a good deal about them already. They are the loveliest mothers
in the world — you all say you remember that.


  TOOTLES:
Mine was lovely. What was yours like, Nibs?


  NIBS:
Lovely. What was yours like, Curly?


  CURLY:
Lovely. What was yours like, Twins?


  TWINS:
Lovely. What was yours like, Slightly?


  SLIGHTLY:
Lovely.


  WENDY:
That will be a help. I shall gather all the loveliest mothers and then watch
them, and if they do the slightest thing wrong they are not your mothers, but
if they do anything just so, then they are your mothers.


  SECOND
TWIN
: Oh, Peter, can we go?


  PETER:
All right!


  TOOTLES:
Let's put on our blacks — first impressions are so important.


  WENDY:
No, your mothers will excuse your pyjamas, but there is one thing you must all
bring: the baby clothes you were lost in.


  SLIGHTLY:
Let's make parcels of them! (All exeunt by different doors except Wendy and
Peter.)


  WENDY:
Get yours too, Peter.


  PETER:
But I'm not going with you, Wendy.


  WENDY:
Yes, Peter.


  PETER:
Oh no.


  WENDY:
Peter, to find your mother.


  PETER
(frightened): No — no — perhaps she would say I was old,
Wendy! I just want you to be my mother.


  WENDY:
Your mother! Oh dear!




(All
the children come bounding back, each carrying a stick over shoulder with bundle
tied in handkerchief on it. John and alexander have no bundles.)




  NIBS:
They are in our handkerchiefs, Wendy.


  WENDY:
But — but Peter isn't coming!


  SEVERAL:
Peter not coming?


  PETER:
No. Now then, no fuss — no blubbering. Are you ready, Tippy? (Tippy
pulls back curtains and flies out ringing.)
Lead the way.




(Tippy
exits at Peter's door but does not appear above. In the meantime the Pirates
— about a dozen of them have crept unseen upon the Indians and suddenly
the air is full of cries as the two parties engage in mortal conflict with cutlasses
and tomahawks. Consternation below.)




  TOOTLES:
It must be the Pirates!


  PETER:
The Indians are fighting them. I must help them!


  WENDY:
Peter, don't leave me!


  SEVERAL:
Don't leave us, Peter!




(Peter
with drawn knife stands ready to defend all. They listen breathlessly. The fight
is grim and realistic and Capt. Hook's hook plays a prominent part but soon
it is over. The Indians wounded &c, fly away R. Pirates remain victorious.
There is sudden stillness — Pirates sign caution and listen to what is
going
on below.)


  PETER:
It's over!


  WENDY:
But who has won?


  SLIGHTLY:
If the Pirates have they will attack us!


  PETER:
H'sh! If the Indians have won they will beat the tom-tom. That's always their
sign of victory. Listen! (Hook signs triumphantly to Starkey who brings him
tom-tom flung down by Indians. Hook beats it.)
The tom-tom! An Indian victory.


  ALL
(below): Hurrah! Hurrah!


  PETER:
You are quite safe now Wendy for the Redskins will guide you safely. Boys, goodbye,
I hope you will like your mothers. Wendy. (He breaks down.)


  HOOK
(whispering): A man to every tree.


  STARKEY:
Shall we give them Johnny Corkscrew?


  HOOK:
No. Gag them and take them to the ship. (At a sign a man steals to each tree.)


  PETER
(to boys): All turn away your faces so that you can't see your Captain
crying. (They do so.) Goodbye Wendy. (Kisses her.)


  WENDY:
Peter, you will remember about changing your flannels, won't you?


  PETER:
Yes.


  WENDY:
And that is your medicine, you know. (Pointing to bottle.)


  PETER:
I won't forget it.


  WENDY:
I shall sometimes come back to see you, Peter.


  PETER:
You will never come back.


  WENDY:
You will sometimes come to my window, won't you?


  PETER:
Sometimes, but I shall never let you know I'm there.


  WENDY:
Peter, what are you to me? You are my — what?


  PETER:
Your son, Wendy.


  WENDY:
Oh! Goodbye.




(All
exeunt by various trees leaving Peter alone. He sits gloomily, head in hand.
As each emerges he is seized by Pirates, gagged and thrust into the little house
and door locked. The children get out of house at back unknown to audience and
the house, for a reason presently to be seen, has now a floor. Peter, unaware
of what has happened above, locks all the doors, pours his medicine into glass
and puts it near bed but forgets to take it. He puts out all lights except one
near bed, gets into bed sadly and sleeps. Hook signs to his men and they go
down trees trying to get Peter and rattle the lower doors but can't open them.
Hook's right arm and hook are inserted at window, clawing for Peter, but just
fail to reach him. Cecco appears on tip carrying a tin cup.)


  


  STARKEY:
What's that?


  CECCO:
Ice-cold water — the captain wants it for Peter Pan. (Disappears at
back.)


  STARKEY:
I see! The captain's to pour it into his medicine-glass Peter will drink it
for he has no mother now, and the boy, who when he's flushed drinks cold waters,
dies. It works like poison.




(Hook
is seen through window emptying medicine glass and pouring cold water into it.
He reappears above exulting, signs to his men, four of them lift the little
house like a sedan chair and exeunt all Pirates carrying it L. The crocodile
appears R. and exits after them L. There is a cautious tapping at Peter's door
below.)




  PETER
(waking up): Who's that? (No answer — then a knock.) Is
anyone there? (Silence — then more knocking.) I won't open unless
you speak. (Silence — knocking. He gets pistol — cautiously opens
door and Tippy darts in ringing. It should be noticed that Tippy has not emerged
at top. She rings excitedly.)
What? The Redskins were defeated and Wendy
and the boys have been captured by the Pirates! Oh! Oh! I'll rescue her —
I'll rescue her. (Rushes about getting weapons. Tippy rings.) What? Oh
it's just my medicine. (Bells.) Poisoned? Nonsense! Who could have poisoned
it? I promised Wendy to take and I'm going to as soon as ever I've sharpened
my dagger. (He is sharpening it on a revolving grindstone. Tippy darts to
glass and is seen apparently drinking it but the poison really goes down stem.)

*No then, Tippy you've drunk my medicine. (Tippy darts about strangely.)
What's the matter with you? (Bells.) It was poison! You drank
it to save my life? Tippy, dear Tippy are you dying? (Tippy flies to her
little room and to bed — rings feebly.)
She's dying! (To audience.)
Her light's growing faint and if it goes out that means she's dead. Her voice
is so low I can scarcely tell what she's saying. (Weak bells — he runs
between her and audience.)
She says she thinks she could get well again
if children believe if fairies. Do you believe? Say quick that you believe!
(The light has been flickering but now children in audience are expected
to begin to demonstrate.)
Wave your handkerchiefs so that she may see you
believe — Don't let Tippy die. The light's getting stronger — wave,
wave, wave. She's much better. She's all right now — oh thank you, thank
you , and now to rescue Wendy!




(He
puts a mask over his face, rushes upstairs and off L. looking for track. Tippy
darts about gaily, ringing in bell language the air of
Sally in our Alley
then darts upstairs and off L.)




CURTAIN